Tailoring Your Website for Multiple Browsers


Submitted by Jack Mack | Category: Programming | Published on Jul 19, 2010
 
Abstract:
One aspect of web design that must always be taken into account is enabling your site to function well in the variety of browsers available. It is an often overlooked aspect in the development stage but is important for your audience.

There are a lot of details that go into the designing of a website. You must first take into account the setup and look of the page. There will the links fit, what is the colour scheme. Next you look at potential content and how many pages you are going to require. Furthermore this is all happening long before you start writing the HTML, CSS, PHP, etc. Then you also have to work out what images you are going to use. All in all it's a complicated procedure which requires a lot of forward planning.

One aspect that must always be taken into account during this forward planning is enabling your site to function well in the variety of browsers available. It is an often overlooked aspect in the development stage but is important in ensuring that all of your users can view your page the way it's intended. While internet explorer is the most commonly used web browsers few people realize the importance of others.

Firefox in particular has a share of almost a quarter of the browser market, and in parts of Europe it is as popular as internet explorer. There are several others including Safari, Chrome (which is currently the new upstart of the browser world) and Opera which is the default browser for many mobile phones as well as the Nintendo Wii.

There are of course several aspects of your site that can be affected by cross-browser compatibility. Your CSS is crucial to the layout of your page and so is very likely to be affected in different browsers. Usually it is not a matter of compatibility but simply a different way of outputting the format of the page. Unfortunately this can often make the page look pretty bad in certain browsers.

The way to avoid this is to test your layout very early on in several relevant browsers. That way it can be tweaked to ensure that it will look good in them before you have done extensive work on the site.

Another issue is with the application of JavaScript on the site. Sometimes different browsers take issue with certain functions. All that can be done here is to ensure that it is not a crucial element on your site and try to adapt to suit each. Once the site is up you can look into online credit card processing for your business and the use of payment gateways to bring in revenue.

People often forget to consider the use of other browsers, but doing so can result in you alienating many of your users and losing out on potential clients.
 

 

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