Radioactive Fallout : Can Radiation from Japan Hitch a Ride into the States?


Submitted by John Kevin | Category: General Interest | Published on Mar 29, 2011
 
Abstract:
Japan's devastating earthquake and the resulting tsunami have already claimed thousands of precious lives and have not stopped there.

Japan's devastating earthquake and the resulting tsunami have already claimed thousands of precious lives and have not stopped there. The Japanese government is feverishly fighting possible meltdowns of multiple nuclear reactors, and radiation has spiked to dangerous levels in some areas around the compromised facilities. The US government has gone out of its way explaining to us that radiation from these plants won't travel here in anything close to dangerous quantities, but what about the vehicles coming over from Japan?

Japan's big three, Toyota, Honda and Nissan are working hard to assure car buyers that their products are not contaminated with radioactive residue from the damaged nuclear reactors in Fukushima. According to Japan's big three, the vast majority of their plants are nowhere near a nuclear reactor, with the exception of one Nissan engine plant but according to the Nissan Americas communications VP the company will take all necessary actions to ensure safety.

atomic energy According to the Toyota communications VP, as a normal procedure, vehicles are plastic-wrapped on ships or wrap-guard and washed at their processing facilities before shipping to dealers. Besides, Customs and Homeland Security routinely monitor shipments for radiation as part of anti-terrorism procedures. Further, the US government routinely inspects cargo entering the US which includes checking for radiation and anything else that can harm American citizens.

Japanese car makers assure that there is no radiation risk with their vehicles exported to the US, after the nuclear plant debacle resulting from Japan's devastating earthquake.

*  Honda, Nissan and Toyota are confident that there is no harmful radiation risk on cars and parts coming from their plants in Japan

*  According to Honda, Nissan and Toyota, they are not overtly worried about radiation risks on vehicles exported to the US in light of ongoing nuclear plant worries after Japan's devastating earthquake

*  According to Honda, its assembly plants are not located anywhere near the damaged nuclear reactors

*  According to Nissan, it is taking all the necessary precautions to ensure that harmful material is not brought into the US, though its power train plant is located 35 miles from one of the damaged reactors

*  According to Toyota, most of its operations in Japan are farther away from the earthquake zone and contamination sources

According to a Nissan America vice president of corporate communications, majority of Nissan's plants and ports are not in the zone where any potential radioactive fallout could cause a problem. Nissan's Iwaki power train plant, however, is located about 30 miles from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant that has been at the center of the crisis in Japan.

However it is assured by the automaker that if any radioactive material adheres to their cars or parts, they will take all necessary precautions to ensure that the harmful material is not brought into the country and transferred to their partners and customers. In 2010, 87 percent of the vehicles Honda sold in the US were built domestically. The US imports 13 percent of "finished vehicles".

Nissan has an assembly plant in Tochigi and Honda operates an engine components plant in Tochigi, less than 100 miles from the damaged nuclear reactors in Fukushima. According to a Honda North America senior manager for news media and industry relations, their assembly plants are not located anywhere near the damaged reactors and he reassures the US consumers about any radiation risk in exported vehicles.

Japanese automakers want to keep ahead of any possible safety risk resulting from the radioactive fallout from the damaged nuclear reactors after the massive earthquake in Japan.

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